Reinforced Earth®

Reinforced Earth®


Heavy Haul MSE Walls Provide Industrial Site Infrastructure sticky icon

Reinforced Earth Product in Field

The Marcellus and Utica shale formations, which extend across southern New York, northern and western Pennsylvania, western Maryland, eastern Ohio and almost all of West Virginia, offer a plentiful supply of ethane, a natural gas liquid and a primary raw material in the production of plastics.

A Reduction in Excavation and Backfill for a Tennessee Road Widening Project sticky icon

Reinforced Earth MSE Wall

The bottom line is safety, and that was especially true for approximately 12 miles of SR 16/US 41A between Shelbyville and Tullahoma, about 80 miles southeast of Nashville. This corridor was studied in the mid-1990s by Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) for possible operating deficiencies. TDOT determined that the projected 60% traffic growth by the mid-2010s would lead to more accidents and lower overall safety on what was, essentially, a 2-lane country highway.

Florida's Turnpike - Designing Veterans Expressway Improvements sticky icon

Reinforced Earth Product in Field

Introduction

Construction on the $380 million Veterans Expressway widening project started in summer 2013. When the project is completed, two lanes will be added in each direction: one an express lane, the other a general use toll lane. The project includes 65 Reinforced Earth® MSE walls, totaling 648,420 square feet of wall facing (11 football fields).

Challenges

Faster Travel Time Around Atlanta sticky icon

Reinforced Earth Product in Field

To provide access to and from both travel directions of the adjacent mainline roadways, managed lanes are often constructed in the highway median. In this sometimes narrow space, Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) retaining walls can efficiently retain grade differences across the median between the flanking mainline roadways, supporting ramps, and bridge abutments that are typical of reversible lanes.

MSE Walls Become the Central Aesthetic Feature at La Villita Apartment & Homes sticky icon

Rusticated, stucco-textured top panels above normal water elevation

Responding to specialized customer needs with beauty, performance, service life and economy – that perfectly describes Reinforced Earth® custom-engineered Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) retaining walls from The Reinforced Earth Company (RECo). But sometimes the architecture drives the project and the engineering must follow. That was exactly what Cousins Properties, Inc., manager for land owner Las Colinas Land Limited Partnership, found as it began developing the La Villita luxury apartments and homes, in Irving, TX.

Broad Street Parkway sticky icon

Reinforced Earth Wall adjacent to flood-prone Nashua River

Like main roads in many cities and towns, Broad Street in Nashua, New Hampshire begins in the western suburbs and extends to the westerly edge of the downtown district. Along the way it intersects the F.E. Everett Turnpike (US Rte. 3), a heavily-traveled toll highway running from the Massachusetts border and Boston, to the south, to Concord, the state capital to the north.

Jimmy DeLoach Parkway Eases Flow of Panama Canal Freight: Relieves Truck Congestion sticky icon

Reinforced Earth Product in Field

Did you know that the Panama Canal flows all the way to Savannah, Georgia?  Maybe not literally, but the Port of Savannah has the largest single container terminal in North America and, in its fiscal year ending June 30, 2015, handled 3.66 million Twenty-foot Equivalent [container] Units, or TEUs. The TEU is the standard measure of containerized freight, equivalent to 20 ft. x 8 ft. x 8 ft., and containers based on this standard can be moved seamlessly between ships and trucks.

SR 154 Bangerter Highway sticky icon

Reinforced Earth Product in Field

Along the southern boundary of Riverton, UT, on the southern edge of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area, two major commuter routes intersected at grade in the middle of a rapidly-growing bedroom community and its supporting commercial development. The resulting traffic nightmares on both east/west Bangerter Highway (SR 154) and north/south South Redwood Road (SR 68) necessitated replacing this signalized intersection with a grade-separated interchange. Utah DOT (UDOT) required a single point urban interchange, with seismic design requirements of 0.66g for walls within 50 ft.

I-70/I-670 Interchange sticky icon

Reinforced Earth Product in Field

Travelers going east or west through Columbus, Ohio, have three route options:  south of downtown along I-70, through downtown on I-670, or bypass the city using circumferential I-270.  All three routes are intersected at different points by I-71, which runs north-south across the city and straight through the heart of Columbus.  The downtown maze where I-70, I-71 and I-670 intersect has long been characterized by high traffic volumes, geometric deficiencies, closely spaced ramps requiring intricate weaving patterns, and a high percentage of both commercial vehicles and large