Highway

Highway


A Reduction in Excavation and Backfill for a Tennessee Road Widening Project sticky icon

Reinforced Earth MSE Wall

The bottom line is safety, and that was especially true for approximately 12 miles of SR 16/US 41A between Shelbyville and Tullahoma, about 80 miles southeast of Nashville. This corridor was studied in the mid-1990s by Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) for possible operating deficiencies. TDOT determined that the projected 60% traffic growth by the mid-2010s would lead to more accidents and lower overall safety on what was, essentially, a 2-lane country highway.

Florida's Turnpike - Designing Veterans Expressway Improvements sticky icon

Reinforced Earth Product in Field

Introduction

Construction on the $380 million Veterans Expressway widening project started in summer 2013. When the project is completed, two lanes will be added in each direction: one an express lane, the other a general use toll lane. The project includes 65 Reinforced Earth® MSE walls, totaling 648,420 square feet of wall facing (11 football fields).

Challenges

Broad Street Parkway sticky icon

Reinforced Earth Wall adjacent to flood-prone Nashua River

Like main roads in many cities and towns, Broad Street in Nashua, New Hampshire begins in the western suburbs and extends to the westerly edge of the downtown district. Along the way it intersects the F.E. Everett Turnpike (US Rte. 3), a heavily-traveled toll highway running from the Massachusetts border and Boston, to the south, to Concord, the state capital to the north.

SR 154 Bangerter Highway sticky icon

Reinforced Earth Product in Field

Along the southern boundary of Riverton, UT, on the southern edge of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area, two major commuter routes intersected at grade in the middle of a rapidly-growing bedroom community and its supporting commercial development. The resulting traffic nightmares on both east/west Bangerter Highway (SR 154) and north/south South Redwood Road (SR 68) necessitated replacing this signalized intersection with a grade-separated interchange. Utah DOT (UDOT) required a single point urban interchange, with seismic design requirements of 0.66g for walls within 50 ft.

I-70/I-670 Interchange sticky icon

Reinforced Earth Product in Field

Travelers going east or west through Columbus, Ohio, have three route options:  south of downtown along I-70, through downtown on I-670, or bypass the city using circumferential I-270.  All three routes are intersected at different points by I-71, which runs north-south across the city and straight through the heart of Columbus.  The downtown maze where I-70, I-71 and I-670 intersect has long been characterized by high traffic volumes, geometric deficiencies, closely spaced ramps requiring intricate weaving patterns, and a high percentage of both commercial vehicles and large

Shored Reinforced Earth Walls Take on Challenging Terrain in North Carolina sticky icon

Reinforced Earth Product in Field

In western North Carolina, in the mountainous terrain of the Pisgah National Forest, few roads are straight, fewer are level, and the combination of straight and level is almost non-existent.  Highways thread their way through meandering valleys or along folded and twisting hillsides, defining the shortest distance between towns.  Some roads, like NC Route 194, just cannot avoid the tortuous curves and terrifying switchbacks imposed by an unforgiving topography, sometimes seeming to trace the alignment of a piece of ribbon candy turned on edge.  Though in places barely two la

West County Connectors sticky icon

Reinforced Earth Product in Field

The Orange County Transportation Authority, in a joint venture with the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), is nearing completion of the $277 million West County Connectors project.  Funded in part by $50 million from the Federal Highway Administration under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, this project is significantly improving traffic flow and safety through the SR-22/I-405/I-605 interchange connecting to Garden Grove, Westminster, Seal Beach, Los Alamitos, Long Beach and Rossmoor.  Eight traffic barrier-topped Reinforced Earth mechanically stabilized

Fairfax County Parkway/Fair Lakes Parkway Interchange sticky icon

Reinforced Earth Product in Field

In the early 1990s, developers had their eyes on several tracts of land in west-central Fairfax County, Virginia, planning to build shops, offices, restaurants, homes, schools and the other physical features of modern suburban life.  Simultaneously, the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) had been planning a north-south parkway through the western part of the county.  Utilizing the "proffer system", in which developers are required to pay for (or directly construct to VDOT standards) certain necessary infrastructure components in exchange for approval of their d